Team World Disc Golf Championship 2017 participants - Colchester, England

Team World Disc Golf Championship 2017 participants - Colchester, England

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About the team world disc golf championships (TWDGC)

In early 2014, the PDGA and the World Flying Disc Federation agreed to the development of a new jointly-sanctioned World Championship Disc Golf event, the format of which will be a national team competition. A “World Cup” for disc golf, so to speak. This new competition brings forth one of the most competitive, unique and under-utilized formats in disc golf; team play.

Through this event, the hope is to capture the excitement of a disc golf World Championship and combine it with the important traits of being a team member, such as cooperation, trust and pride. Team play allows for different styles of play throughout the competition, such as match play and doubles, to name a few. It also emphasizes the important attributes of cooperation, teamwork, trust and friendship.
- (Credit PDGA)


team usa at Twdgc - history

Team Japan - bronze medal winners: Masatoshi Ishihara, Shigeko Sekiguchi, Manabu Kajiyama, Yuki Fukuhara, Kazuo Shirai, Team USA - World Champions: Mark Kilmer, Nick Wood, Zac Ruziska, Jason Pinkal, Ashlee Harris, Tim Skellenger Team New Zealand - Silver - Kyle Martin, Hazen Simson, Siep Van Vliet, Gemma Sullivan, Jackson Sullivan, Hayley May Flintoft, Peter Boyle, Simon Feasey

Team Japan - bronze medal winners: Masatoshi Ishihara, Shigeko Sekiguchi, Manabu Kajiyama, Yuki Fukuhara, Kazuo Shirai, Team USA - World Champions: Mark Kilmer, Nick Wood, Zac Ruziska, Jason Pinkal, Ashlee Harris, Tim Skellenger Team New Zealand - Silver - Kyle Martin, Hazen Simson, Siep Van Vliet, Gemma Sullivan, Jackson Sullivan, Hayley May Flintoft, Peter Boyle, Simon Feasey

2016 - TEAM usa wins gold medal in Vancouver, BC Canada

USA wins Gold over New Zealand in Day of Upsets at Team World Championships - by Brian Hoeninger

A dramatic day of semi-final and final round action and upsets brought the inaugural PDGA-WFDF Team Disc Golf World Championships, presented by DGA , to a climax today in Vancouver, Canada. Team Canada and Japan had appeared to be the favourites to advance to the finals after they finished 1-2 in regulation play. However their dreams were dashed in stunning fashion in the morning’s 18 hole match play semis.

Team USA saved their best golf for when it counted most by defeating Team Japan 6-2. The critical moment occurred when Japan’s top shooter, Manabu Kajiyama, inadvertently played from a USA player’s lie, an unfortunate error that cost him the hole from which he never fully recovered. He ended up losing his match against Nick Wood by 5 holes to 4; had he won by the same score, Japan and not USA, would’ve advanced to the Gold Medal match.

The competitively stunning and cutthroat nature of match play was on full display in the Canada-New Zealand semi. When Kiwi Gemma Sullivan hit a 7 meter / 23 foot headwind putt on the final hole the teams finished tied in both matches and total holes won which meant … playoff. Kiwi captain Simon Feasey stepped up to the designated Hole 7 tee and smoothed his drive down the 379 foot tree lined fairway to within 5 meters of the bucket. Feeling the pressure, Canuck Hector Diakow, who had won the toss but opted to toss second, threw a worm burner, but then, facing do or die, hit metal from 180 feet. When Simon calmly drained the putt, it was New Zealand – who Canada had beat 7-1 the day before in match play – that advanced to the gold medal showdown versus the Americans. Wow.

Team Japan took the bronze medal match over Canada 6- 2 with senior grandmaster-age Kazuo Shirai’s crucial wins on holes 16 and 17 to go from 1 down to 1 up proving to be the difference. Had Shirai-san remained 1-down to Steve Crichton the teams would’ve been in a dead heat and playoff bound. But after dominating regulation play it simply was not Team Canada’s day.

The USA-New Zealand battle for glory had all the makings of a classic championship match. Not only had the 2 squads tied in regulation match play and match play holes won, they had also finished in a dead tie in the total team score round. But USA’s cruise to gold was not to be denied as they shrugged off an early Kiwi lead to win convincingly by 7 points to 1 (3 wins and a draw in the 4 matches). And now this group of players from Washington and Oregon States will go down in disc golf history as the first Team World Champions: MPO Tim Skellenger, MPO Zac Ruziska, MPO Nick Wood, FPO Ashlee Harris, Captain and MPM Mark Kilmer, and MPM Jason Pinkal.


Team USA 2017: Ashlee Harris, Zac Ruziska, Dan Laitsch, Mark Kilmer, Kyle Kelly, Kevin Sheehan Jr.

Team USA 2017: Ashlee Harris, Zac Ruziska, Dan Laitsch, Mark Kilmer, Kyle Kelly, Kevin Sheehan Jr.

2017 - colchester, england

From day one there were exciting games, surprise results and exceptional skill on view. Players did their part but there were also some crucial calls from captains in team selection for each match in each round.

Round one was a ten-team round robin where every game featured two singles and two doubles matches for the teams of six. Every game would be match play throughout the event. Each game was also played using a different combination of players so each team member had three singles and six doubles matches - playing with all their team mates in alternate shot doubles over nine holes. With each of the four matches per game worth two points - reigning champions USA started with a 4-4 draw with hosts Great Britain (GBR). Finland (FIN) then beat France (FRA) 5-3; New Zealand (NZL) took Slovakia (SVK) 7-1; Canada (CAN) lost to an underrated Estonia (EST) 6-2 and Czech Republic (CZE) drew with Croatia (CRO) 4-4. These results did not reflect the final table results until Round 1 was into Game 7 where FIN, EST and CAN became clear favourites moving towards Round two.

In WFDF tradition the top seeds were given first choice for round two from teams placed 5 to 8. FIN chose CZE, EST then picked GBR after beating them 7-1 in the pool match, CAN chose USA leaving NZL to play FRA. By the end of Day 3 and end of round two the tension and excitement were high. There were comfortable wins for Finland and Canada - both 6-2 victors over Czech Republic and reigning champions USA respectively but the other two matches produced controversy and excitement to the last. Round 2 was tough shot doubles and two singles match play games with the masters and juniors together in the singles. The doubles were the third seeded open player and the woman player; the other being the top two open players. Tough shot is where opponents choose the worst of two shots for players to complete next - but when a hole is complete by holing out the hole is over.

Unfortunately this time around, team USA found themselves running on empty, carrying a skeleton team of only six meant no rest for any of this talented and hard working bunch. With an 8th-place finish, Team USA is motivated to bring back the glory of 2016, and looking to build on lessons learned from both 2016 and ‘17.

Full recap here.